Resources

From publications to toolkits, GEO’s resources lift up experiences from your peers to help you turn knowledge into action.

Publication

Exploring Microcultures and Why They Matter

This is a publication about microcultures in philanthropy — small groups of people in our organizations with their own assumptions, values and working behaviors. These groups significantly shape the underlying character of our organizations.
  • June 7, 2017

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About 850 results.

  • Member Story

    Smarter Grantmaking in Action: Vancouver Foundation

    How Vancouver Foundation made progress by getting out of the way and supporting nonprofits to do the work.
    • July 20, 2017
    • Shantaé François
  • GEOList Members Only

    GEOList Summary: If and How You Assist Grantees in Identifying Qualified Board Members

    If you have helped grantees to identify and/or recruit board members, please share what you have done and what you have learned. What worked? What didn’t work as you hoped?
    • July 17, 2017
    • Rumsha Ahmed
  • GEOList Members Only

    GEOList Summary: Evaluation Contract Language

    We are interested in updating language in our evaluation contracts related to ownership of the knowledge generated through that evaluation work. Many of the entities who partner with us to evaluate our work are researchers on the topic we are evaluating (for instance, the evaluation partner for our Healthy Schools Healthy Communities work has a robust portfolio of experience publishing on conditions for promoting healthy behaviors in communities). As such, we view the evaluation as mutually beneficial, giving the Foundation information on the effectiveness of our work but also allowing our work to contribute to the broader field of knowledge and research on a particular topic. We recently realized that standard language in our contracts is at odds with the idea that our evaluations are not simply contracts for services for the Foundation but contributing to the broader field of research. Specifically, our contract language states that the evaluator must get permission and approval from the Foundation prior to publishing or presenting on our work. There are certain scenarios where this makes sense but, more and more, we are coming across scenarios where we want to give other entities freedom to work with our information. As a Foundation we are committed to sharing what has and hasn’t been effective in our work, contributing knowledge gained to the broader field. That said, there is concern from a legal perspective of handing over all permissions to publish using data and information generated from our work. I am interested to know if anyone has created contract language that acknowledges the mutually beneficial nature of this work, protecting the Foundation’s interest and giving research partners the freedom necessary to pursue their work.
    • July 17, 2017
    • Rumsha Ahmed
  • GEOList Members Only

    GEOList Summary: Peer Review Process for Grantmaking

    I am interested to know which grant makers use a peer review process (either internal or external) to review grants and make programmatic investment decisions. At the California Health Care Foundation (CHCF), we have an internal peer review process that is core to how we review our work and make funding decisions. It is also core to our organizational learning. If your organization uses any sort of peer review process in this context, I would be interested to know that and learn a little about how you structure your process.
    • July 10, 2017
    • Rumsha Ahmed
  • GEOList Members Only

    GEOList Summary: Engaging Full Staff/Board on Diversity Equity Inclusion

    Northwest Area Foundation is entering into a new phase of being more intentional around diversity, equity, inclusion (DEI). I’m working with an internal team and we’ve developed goals, purpose, an initial work plan, and are capturing our current DEI practices, but right now what I’m seeking is “lessons learned” around engaging full staff and the board on a DEI effort. How did you think strategically about what input, when and why? I’d also love to see other examples of DEI “work plans” out there and if you have any dos/don’ts around org-wide assessments.
    • July 10, 2017
    • Rumsha Ahmed
  • Event Materials Members Only

    The Learning Conference 2017 Discussion Guide: Culture in Action

    Recognizing the need for adopting and maintaining a learning culture in our organizations is just the first step. How do we go about addressing the challenge of actually creating and living out this culture in our daily work and across our organization? What does it mean to have an active learning culture in your organization?
    • July 7, 2017
  • Event Materials Members Only

    The Learning Conference 2017 Discussion Guide: Visualizing Data for Your Audience

    Jon Schwabish’s Short Talk at GEO’s Learning Conference 2017 offered ways to expand how we think about about sharing information by considering the many ways to visualize data and how those visualization efforts help different audiences.
    • July 7, 2017
  • Event Materials Members Only

    The Learning Conference 2017 Discussion Guide: Listening to Communities for Transformational Change

    At GEO’s Learning Conference 2017, Rami Nashashibi, the executive director of the Inner-City Muslim Action Network (IMAN), discussed how funders can engage with American Muslim identity, community activism and social justice issues for effective and truly transformative grantmaking.
    • July 7, 2017
  • Event Materials Members Only

    The Learning Conference 2017 Discussion Guide: Disrupting a City's Culture Using Evidence-Based Optimism

    As the managing director of Chicago Beyond, a philanthropic venture investing in ideas and programs to amplify impact for Chicago’s youth, Liz Dozier discussed at GEO’s Learning Conference 2017 how Chicago Beyond is bringing community voice into data collection to answer thorny questions and spur the innovation it seeks for the young people of Chicago.
    • July 7, 2017
  • Event Materials Members Only

    The Learning Conference 2017 Discussion Guide: Who Do You Think We Are?

    At GEO’s Learning Conference 2017, Trabian Shorters of the BMe Community discussed how negative portrayals of black men and African American communities affect the ways we interact with communities. And Trabian outlined how “asset-framing” and changing the way we think and talk about certain communities can be used to combat bias, shift perspective and inspire constructive action.
    • July 7, 2017